Skip to content

Today's Creation Moment

Oct
24
How to Make a "Bananatrode"
Psalm 147:5
"Great is our Lord, and of great power: his understanding is infinite."
Just imagine a scientist going to the supermarket where he picks up a banana, an antenna from a blue crab, and a whisker from a catfish. He takes these back to his lab, hooks them together and...
RSS
share

Uncategorized

The Archaeopteryx

Archaeopteryx specimen1. Archaeopteryx means "early wing" and is the paleontologist's Rosetta stone seemingly providing the perfect evidence for the otherwise elusive transition creatures which should fill the rocks with their fossil remains. First discovered in 1861, it is the purported transition between the dinosaur and the bird; seven specimens are claimed to exist.

Footnotes: 

Photo: The Berlin archaeopteryx specimen. Courtesy of H. Raab. (CC A-SA 3.0 Unported)

The Idea of Progress

Author: 
Ian Taylor

It would seem almost ludicrous to ask the question, has mankind made progress since his appearance on this planet? The advance of technology is now so rapid that everyone can remember how things used to be: laborsaving in the home, ease of transportation and the wonders of communication, come to mind. The answer is, of course, in the affirmative. Or is it? Most people give the matter little thought and when pressed will say, It should be perfectly obvious that mankind has come a long way from the cave.

Footnotes: 

1. Lattimore, Richmond, translator. Hesiod.
University of Michigan Press. 1959.
The story of Prometheus: Lines 42-105.
The story of the races: Lines 106-200
The character of the Golden race: Lines 110-126.
The quote “some good things mixed with the evils.” Line 179.

2. Grene, David translator. Prometheus Bound
In: Aeschylus II David Grene ed.
University of Chicago Press, 1956. Lines 442-471.

3. Jowett, B., translator. The Dialogues of Plato.
N.Y. Random House, 2 vols. 1937    
The quote, "… was naked and shoeless etc…"
Vol. 1, Protagoras, line 321.

4. Dods, Marcus, translator. The City of God by Saint Augustine.  
N.Y.: The Modern Library, Random House 1950.
The necessity of history: Book II, part 23.
The division of history:  Books XIII to Book XVIII
The final destruction of evil: Book XX, part 16

5. Nisbet, Robert. History of the Idea of Progress .
N.Y. Basic Books, 1980, p.124.

6. Darwin, Charles. The Descent of Man.
London: John Murray, 1871, 2 vols.
Vol 1, Chapters 2ff continual reference to “savages.”

7. Hooper, J. A. & A. Whyld. The Oxford Companion to Chess.
Oxford University Press, 1992,  p.206.

8. Hunter, Ian M. L.  An Exceptional Talent for Calculating Thinking  
British Journal of Psychology  1962, Vol. 53, p. 243-258.

Syndicate content