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Today's Creation Moment

Apr
18
The Days in Genesis
Genesis 1:5
“And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.”
Silently, a huge, powerful form slides through the deep, cold, dark depths of the sea. The men aboard the nuclear submarine have seen neither sun nor daylight for months, yet each one knows what day...
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LOGICAL FALLACIES OF EVOLUTION 101: BEGGING THE QUESTION

 

Today's guest blogger is Rod Carty, a friend of Creation Moments who serves as a co-administrator in our Facebook groups. An avid creationist, scientist and teacher, Rod frequently uses his understanding of logical fallacies to let evolutionists know when they are using them in our Facebook groups.
It seems to me that the most common fallacy I encounter is "begging the question." A very common example of this comes in the form of, "There wasn't enough water in the Biblical Flood to cover all the mountains" or "Where did all the water go?" 
What they are asserting is that there wasn't enough water to cover the present-day mountains. This is fallacious because they are presuming evolutionary time scales for the rates of the mountains forming – that is, millions of years. This means that the mountains we have today would have been nearly identical in height just 4,500 years ago at the time of the Flood. This is begging the question because the premise of their argument assumes long ages are true in order to argue that long ages are true (and, thus, that the Flood could not have happened).
If, as creationists say, the mountains we have today formed rapidly, starting during the Flood, then there is no problem with the amount of water we have today covering the Earth. Thus, the Flood account only seems inconsistent if you don't use all of the Flood model's premises. Taken together, the Flood model explains consistently the evidence we have in the geologic record.
Because of their presuppositions – namely, that what we see today was caused by slow changes over millions or billions of years – it is quite common to see evolutionists fall into this type of logical fallacy.

Today's guest blogger is Rod Carty, a friend of Creation Moments who serves as a co-administrator in our Facebook groups. A scientist, teacher and avid creationist, Rod frequently uses his understanding of logical fallacies to let evolutionists know when they are using them in our Facebook groups.

It seems to me that the most common fallacy I encounter is "begging the question." A very common example of this comes in the form of, "There wasn't enough water in the Biblical Flood to cover all the mountains" or "Where did all the water go?" 

What they are asserting is that there wasn't enough water to cover the present-day mountains. This is fallacious because they are presuming evolutionary time scales for the rates of the mountains forming – that is, millions of years. This means that the mountains we have today would have been nearly identical in height just 4,500 years ago at the time of the Flood. This is begging the question because the premise of their argument assumes long ages are true in order to argue that long ages are true (and, thus, that the Flood could not have happened).

If, as creationists say, the mountains we have today formed rapidly, starting during the Flood, then there is no problem with the amount of water we have today covering the Earth. Thus, the Flood account only seems inconsistent if you don't use all of the Flood model's premises. Taken together, the Flood model explains consistently the evidence we have in the geologic record.

Because of their presuppositions – namely, that what we see today was caused by slow changes over millions or billions of years – it is quite common to see evolutionists fall into this type of logical fallacy.

 

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