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Today's Creation Moment

Sep
30
The Most Complex Structure in the Universe
Job 38:36
"Who hath put wisdom in the inward parts? or who hath given understanding to the heart?"
Whether you know it or not, you are the proud owner of the most complex arrangement of matter in the universe. I am speaking of your brain. Even though it weighs only three pounds, the brain's...
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Lizard Language

Acts 2:6
And when this sound occurred, the multitude came together, and were confused, because everyone heard them speak in his own language.

Since God is the Author of all language, we shouldn't be surprised to find many and varied forms of communication among the creatures He made.

The recent discovery that even lowly lizards communicate with one another has offered several surprises for those who believe we evolved. In analyzing over 1,500 displays by sagebrush lizards, researchers say that there is no question that they are communicating with one another. Lizard communication is complex body language that follows recognizable rules of grammar. It is made up of three parts, which include head bobbing, "push ups," and leg motion. Mixing and matching one or more of these actions results in over six thousand possibilities!

But what do lizards say to one another? Repeated observations have convinced researchers that they can interpret what the lizards are saying to each other. Much of the communication is used to woo a mate. Lizards will also brag to other lizards when they find a particularly good rock. But a lizard may also warn away another lizard who might want to share his rock.

Not only is such complex communication among lowly lizards not expected by evolution, but also researchers noted that the pattern of communication over separated populations does not follow expected evolutionary patterns. Yes, even the lowly lizard glorifies its Creator!

Prayer: 
We thank You, dear Father, for the gift of language. We especially thank You for Your trustworthy Word. Amen.
Notes: 
Susan Milius, "When Lizards Do Push-Ups," Science News, v. 155, February 27, 1999, p. 142.