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Today's Creation Moment

Jul
31
This Carbon-14 Discovery Is a Gem
Job 28:16
"It [wisdom] cannot be valued with the gold of Ophir, with the precious onyx, or the sapphire."
Because half of the radioactive carbon-14 in anything decays to nonradioactive material in 5,730 years, things that are supposedly millions of years old cannot possibly have any. At least that's what...
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There's Not A Chance It's Chance!

Psalm 104:24
O LORD, how manifold are Your works! In wisdom You have made them all. The earth is full of Your possessions.

As we learn more about the genetic code, it is becoming increasingly difficult to escape the conclusion that all living things—and by implication, all things—have a very wise, personal Creator. At least one researcher in this field has admitted that it is extremely unlikely that the genetic code shared by almost all living things arose by chance.

Researchers have concluded that nearly a billion billion genetic codes are possible. That's a one, followed by 18 zeros! But not all genetic codes are created equal, so to speak. Some are better than others at preventing errors when new genetic material or the proteins made by genetic material is produced. And when genetic errors are made in the production of protein, a better genetic code will seek to minimize the error. The genetic code we have is the best at doing this. More than that, the code we have is the best at minimizing the damage caused by faulty proteins at the very genes where it is most likely to happen! After admitting this code couldn't happen by chance, one researcher then gave the credit to "natural selection."

That the genetic code is an information storage system vastly more complex anything we have ever built should tell us that it has a wise and powerful Creator. That the genetic system we have is the best one of over one billion billion possibilities should seal the case for God as Creator.

Prayer: 
I thank You, Father, that I am Your hand made possession. Amen.
Notes: 
Jonathan Knight, Top Translator, New Scientist, 18 April 1998, p.15