Skip to content

Today's Creation Moment

Aug
27
This Flower Is a Real Stinker
Isaiah 40:28
"Hast thou not known? hast thou not heard, that the everlasting God, the LORD, the Creator of the ends of the earth, fainteth not, neither is weary? there is no...
Dung beetles may not be a very pleasant subject, but after all, someone has to do the housekeeping. So God created what man has classified into 30,000 species of dung beetle. Many will form their...
RSS
share

Barreleyes

Jeremiah 32:27
"Behold, I am the LORD, the God of all flesh: is there any thing too hard for me?"

Almost all sighted animals that aren't insects see with eyeballs. But that is not true of a fish named barreleyes, and that's for a good reason.

Barreleyes has that name because instead of eyeballs, the fish sees through tubes. The fish live barreleyesa third of a mile below the surface, so studying them in detail was not possible until the last few decades. Barreleyes can move its eyetubes in different directions, depending on what it wants to look at. Even stranger, the eyetubes are inside the forehead and do not come into contact with the water at all. How can it see if its vision organs are inside its head? It has a transparent forehead filled with transparent liquid. What is the purpose of such a strange arrangement? Scientists believe that barreleyes eat siphonophores, which are jellyfish-like creatures that sting. The transparent forehead protects its eyes from getting stung.

Barreleyes' uniquely designed eyes are impossible to explain with gradual evolutionary modifications of regular fish eyes. Yet, they are well designed for barreleye's unusual way of making a living. As Scripture reminds us several times, nothing is too hard for God. As we read Scripture's record of what God has done in the past and what He has promised He still will do, especially for His people, this reminder is a comfort.

Prayer: 
Father, when I read of what You have promised me, remind me that nothing is too hard for You. Amen.
Notes: 
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/41732, Susan Millius, "Barreleye peers at the world like a fighter pilot does through a windshield."