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Today's Creation Moment

Aug
29
New Problems for Origin of Life Theories
Psalm 36:9
"For with You is the fountain of life; in Your light we see light."
The usual theories for the origin of life have the first genetic material assembling itself by chance in a hot setting. Some have suggested that this may have happened in an undersea thermal vent or...
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Fresh Dust?

1 Corinthians 15:40
"There are also celestial bodies, and bodies terrestrial: but the glory of the celestial is one, and the glory of the terrestrial is another."

The last few years have seen a good deal of excitement among astronomers over the possibility of discovering planets orbiting distant stars. Astronomers are looking at stars that are surrounded by disks of dust and debris.

The idea is that planets form over millions of years from the dust and rock that orbits a star. This Fresh dustwas supposedly how the Earth formed billions of years ago. Hundreds of such stars have so far been identified. Often, these debris fields extend further from the star they orbit than, say, Pluto is from our sun. The question is, are the discovery of planets and debris around other stars proof of evolution's story of the formation of the Earth?

Scientists believe that it takes two or three million years for planets to form out of the orbiting debris. However, they also recognize that it only takes a few thousand years before a star's gravity draws the dust into itself, or the pressure of its radiation forces the dust away from itself. This leaves the hundreds of stars with dusty debris fields a mystery. Astronomers believe that all these stars still have their dust after millions or billions of years because they are getting fresh dust from somewhere else, but scientists don't know where.

Perhaps a better explanation is that these stars are only about 6,000 years old.

Prayer: 
Father, I thank You for Your trustworthy Word, which tells me of the forgiveness of sins through Your Son. Amen.
Notes: 
Science News, 7/2/05, pp. 10-12, Ron Cowen, "Panning Distant Dust."