Skip to content

Today's Creation Moment

Jun
25
Not a Fish Lizard
Genesis 1:20
“And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.”
Like so many children over the last century, I was given a book about dinosaurs when I was a small boy. This book contained references to a number of extinct creatures other than dinosaurs, and one...
share

He Walks on Water

Matthew 14:25
“And in the fourth watch of the night Jesus went unto them, walking on the sea.”

Image: Chart of bouyancyWhat happens if a man tries to walk on water? The answer is that his feet would sink into the water.

Of course, it is possible for people to float. This is because of the buoyancy produced by the force of the displaced water. But if you tried to set your feet on the surface of a body of water, the pressure produced by the weight of your body, through the small surface area of the soles of your feet, is too great for the buoyancy to counteract it.

So, scientifically speaking, Jesus could not walk on water. But Matthew’s Gospel reports in chapter 14 that He did just that. At the beginning of John’s Gospel, we are reminded that all things were made for Jesus, by Jesus and through Jesus. Jesus is, therefore, the One who invented gravity and buoyancy. As the Creator of these forces, He could do what He likes with them, even subverting them, if He so chose.

It is interesting that most Christians can accept that Jesus had control over gravity. And yet, so many Christians still fail to believe that God made the world the way He said that He did in Genesis 1. Why is it so difficult to believe that the One who could walk on water, in defiance of what modern scientists say, could create a universe and inform us in His word of exactly how He did it?

Prayer: 
We praise You, Lord, that You made all things well. When we look at all that You made, we just have to stand in awe at Your Holy Name. Amen.
Notes: 
Ref: Encyclopaedia Britannica, < https://www.britannica.com/science/buoyancy >, accessed 8/29/2017. Image: Public Domain.