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Today's Creation Moment

Sep
27
Birds With a Memory to Envy
Job 38:41
"Who provideth for the raven his food? when his young ones cry unto God, they wander for lack of meat."
The shy bird called Clark's nutcracker collects food during the growing season and stores it for the cold winter months. In one year, a bird will store between 22,000 and 33,000 seeds in as many as 2...
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Spider Web!

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Proverbs 30:28
“The spider taketh hold with her hands, and is in king’s palaces.”

About 10 percent of the 35,000 known species of spiders spin the familiar orb-shaped web. These amazing sticky silk constructions may be a few inches or even a yard across.

The first step in building an orb web is to cast out the highest horizontal silk line in the planned construction. Once both ends are anchored, the spider then pulls another strand below the anchor line into a Spider web“y” shape, then drops down while creating another silk strand to complete the leg of the “y”. Other anchor lines may be attached from the center of the “y” to solid objects before the familiar spiral of the orb-web is started. Despite all of this work, most spiders take their webs down, eating the silk as they go, every day before the sun comes up. One question that nearly everyone asks, and scientists cannot even answer, is why don’t spiders get caught in their own sticky webs?

Scientists who believe in evolution have come to the conclusion that since so many different kinds of spiders build orb webs, the knowledge and ability to do so must have evolved many times. But we think it would be absolutely amazing if it even evolved only once!

Proverbs 30:28 refers to the spider’s wisdom and skill, despite its small size. But we have to ask: Who taught the spider in the first place?

Prayer: 
Dear heavenly Father, even the amazing spider shows forth Your wisdom and skill. Give me better sight so that I may more often see and appreciate Your wonderful works. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.
Notes: 
Photo: Courtesy of Rustedstrings. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.