Isaiah 5:20
“Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!”

As Creation Moments has pointed out in the past, evolution is a fundamental corruption of truth with far-reaching consequences – working to undermine and subvert morality, cultures and people.

Richard Dawkins at the University of Texas, Austin, in 2008That’s why we weren’t surprised when outspoken atheist and evolutionist Richard Dawkins defended what he called “mild pedophilia”. He says he experienced it himself as a boy, adding that other children in his school had been molested by the same teacher. He excused it, however, by saying, “I don’t think he did any of us lasting harm.”

The Religious News Service reports that Dawkins believes that the fear of pedophilia is overblown by society. After all, if he and his schoolmates didn’t experience lasting harm from childhood sexual abuse, how bad could it be?

But, of course, Dawkins can never miss an opportunity to take a pot shot at God. He said that fundamentalist religious beliefs, like those found in the Bible, are actually a worse way to abuse a child. In Dawkins’ own words, “Thank goodness, I have never personally experienced what it is like to believe…in hell. But I think it can be plausibly argued that such a deeply held belief might cause a child more long-lasting mental trauma than the temporary embarrassment of mild physical abuse.”

As you can see, evolution really has far-reaching consequences that touches every area of our lives. It tosses absolute standards of morality out the door. And it can even turn an Oxford professor into a defender of pedophilia.

Prayer:
Heavenly Father, while unbelievers berate You for telling us about hell, I am grateful to You for warning us about hell and for providing a Savior to keep us from going there! In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

Notes:
Aby Ohlheiser, “Richard Dawkins Defends ‘Mild’ Pedophilia, Again and Again”, The Wire, 9/10/13. Photo: Richard Dawkins at the University of Texas, Austin, in 2008. (CC-BY 2.0)